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20130211
20130219
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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
that print only the nixon materials. by law, richard nixon's materials could not leave 20 miles outside of the district of columbia because it was felt that richard nixon was not a trustworthy conservator of his material. so they couldn't have a library. by law, he couldn't have a live repaired and that is because richard nixon had cut a deal and congress found out about it. he cut a deal with one of his appointees who was the head of the gao. i'm sorry, the gsa. it is the government services administration appeared at those -- in those days, they ran the national archives. the deal was that richard nixon would have the tapes in five years and could destroy whatever he wanted. whatever was not presented for truck, he could destroy and he could have his papers and destroy them appeared richard nixon cut this deal before he left the white house. congress found out about it, went crazy and seized his materials. that meant that the nixon materials were like a crime scene. i am telling you, running the nixon library is one of the most phenomenal experiences one could have. because what happe
or republican. i voted for richard nixon, ronald reagan, but after the george bush fiasco, the republicans will not give back the tax cuts that george bush's friends liked and they still like thim. they want to get rid of things people need like social security and medicare. host: paul is a republican. caller: good morning. favorite is george bush. host: george w. or george h. w.? caller: george w. bush. host: why? out, iot going to find guess. let's go to democratic caller in iowa. caller: good morning. my favorite is john f. kennedy. he was brilliant. when he gave his inaugural address, he started the peace corps and he brought young kids to help out with the country. he and his brothers were for the poor. it was not just for the rich. he's my favorite. thank you. host: we will keep getting your thoughts on your favorite president throughout the first part of the morning. let me give you some other headlines in the papers. the new york times front page -- next to that is the story about obama's plan for citizenship that was put out on saturday. it says none of the 11 million illegal immi
was suburbanites turned on the democrats and we got richard nixon. we can prematurely declare these things sometimes. a cautionary note. >> goldie, the piece says today's gop is taking its cues from john calhoun and his belief in nullification. the idea that states can ignore federal law. he writes it's not a coincidence that the resurgence of nullification is happening while our first african-american president is in office. how du the gop reach out to a broader demographic when we see how it's treated this nation's first black president? >> that is the grand irony but the truth of the matter is they're not only hearkening back to calhoun, but they're playing the script of kevin phillips who was the chief architect of the southern strategy. this was the chaining together of those southern confederate states, those 11 states, with what was happening out west and up through the midwest, and he said at the time we can frankly do without manhattan. we can do without new york. we can do without chicago. we can do without all these major city that is were largely black and brown. the republican
. >> i think ronald reagan changed the trajectory of america, in a way that, you know, richard nixon did not. and in a way that bill clinton did not. >> i'm sure bill clinton didn't hear that. anyway, president clinton landed in hot water after he declared candidate obama's prior to that in jesse jackson. >> jesse jackson won south carolina twice in '84 and '88. senator obama is not a good campaign here. he's a good candidate. >> well, there you have it. let me ask you about a deeper question, not the cheap shots and the obvious analysis based on either side's point of view. and you know this better than anybody. the natural rivalry, the stuff that just happens because you have to be a rival. if barack obama is a transformational president, he's the guy that has the democratic successor elected. he's the guy that starts a real era? can he win and the clintons not win? or is there a natural rivalry here? >> well, there is a natural rivalry. but, right now, that i hey're inextricably linked. that's what's interesting about this moment in history for the first time, really, starting with th
reagan changed the trajectory of america in a way that, you know, richard nixon did not, and in a way that bill clinton did not. >> i'm sure bill clinton didn't hear that. anyway, president clinton landed in hot water after he compared candidate obama's primary victory down in south carolina to that of jesse jackson's years earlier. some accused clinton of marginalizing obama as the black candidate. let's watch. >> jesse jackson won south carolina twice in '84 and '88. and he ran a good campaign. and senator obama is running a good campaign. he is a good candidate. >> well, there you have it. let me ask you about a deeper question, not the cheap shots or the obvious analysis based on either sides point of view, david. you know this better than anybody. but the natural rivalry, the stuff that just happens because you have to be a rival. if barack obama is a transformational president, meaning he is the guy that did health care. he is the guy that has his successor elected, a democratic successor elected. he is the guy that starts a real era. can he win and the clintons not win? i mean
's curse of the bambino, it has dogged leaders for the past century. richard nixon called for working together in his 1974 address, one year after his landslide re-election. >> i want you to know that i have no intention whatever of ever walking away from the job that the people elected me to do for the people of the united states. >> instead, two months later, nixon owned up to his role in watergate and eventually resigned. ronald reagan was swept into a second term with an historic 49 state landslide. >> there are no constraints on the human mind, no walls around the human spirit, no barriers to our progress except those we ourselves erect. >> but many of his second term domestic plans fell to the wayside as his administration was consumed by the iran contra scandal. in 1997 after leading americans through four years of economic growth, president bill clinton promised something that hasn't been done in three decades. >> we must keep our economy the strongest in the world. we here tonight have an historic opportunity. let this congress be the congress that finally balances the budget
kiss begins with kay ♪ anniversary of richard nixon's birth there's a new exhibit at his presidential library and has a lot of people talking. it contains newly declassified documents that reveal that nixon was corresponding with president bill clinton. jan crawford is here with the story. good morning. >> good morning, norah, good morning, j.b. they have released these incredible documents and it shows a surprisingly warm relationship between presidents nixon and clinton. the correspondence includes a handwritten letter congratulating him on a tough primary and election. that letter was the beginning of an unlikely union between the former republican and the democrat. they say politics make strange bedfellows. that was the case in 1992 when he sent a hand-written note to president clinton. the strongest steel must pass through the hottest fire. in enduring that ordeal you have demonstrate thad you have the character to lead. >> it's a very fascinating letter because he's opening up the door to a new incoming president that i'm on your side that i'm impressed by
and was not removed from office. richard nixon left office and was not removed. they were eligible to receive benefits provided to former presidents. it is not tested whether somebody removed by impeachment would receive these benefits. host: a right-wing response to the comments about george w. bush saying he saved your hide from the terrorists. when do the presidents receive this money? is it one payout each year or monthly? guest: i believe it is a monthly pension. i do not think they get one installment. host: do the presidents request the amount of money they need for different things and break it down for the government? guest: they talk to the office of management and budget. it comes out in the president's budget recommendations about what they have said they will need for that year. a lot of it is set by statute. office space is negotiated through gsa. host: we will go to bill, arlington, texas, independent caller. caller: thank you for taking my call. i was a teacher years back. this was one of the projects i gave on the benefits and pensions for presidents. i was amazed at the research that
hero, eisenhower, the soldier of democracy. and the purely pragmatic political guy, richard nixon, who was essentially forced on eisenhower's ticket by party regulars. and eisenhower was wary of nixon, but also realized he had great political strengths. nixon knew or learned eventually that eisenhower was actually an extraordinary political leader. each learned something from the other. and nixon never quite got out from eisenhower's shadow. there's a great moment in the 1968 republican convention when nixon, at last, you know, is going to be -- now, he'd run in 1960 and lost. here's his chance to win. and what does he say? let's win it for ike. can't get away from ike. >> how about what ike said about nixon in '68, when they asked him about, name one important decision that dick nixon had any input in, and he said, i'll have to get back to you. >> exactly! >> give me a week. >> that was actually 1960, when nixon had been vice president. >> '60, yeah. >> yeah, joe writes, ike and dick is a highly engrossing political narrative that skillfully takes the reader through the twisted develo
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)